animals, yes.
animals, yes.
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pinkhairforever:

Banks
pinkhairforever:

Banks
pinkhairforever:

Banks
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adrienehughes:

THE GIRLS 🐶❤️🐵 #monkey #mia
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pinkhairforever:

Geno at the park
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ucresearch:

The riddle of zebras’ stripes
Why zebras have black and white stripes is a question that has intrigued scientists and spectators for centuries. A research team led by UC Davis, has now examined this riddle (in a very systematic way).
Many hypotheses for zebra stripes have been proposed since Alfred Russel Wallace and Charles Darwin debated the problem 120 years ago. These include:
A form of camouflage
Disrupting predatory attack by visually confusing carnivores
A mechanism of heat management
Having a social function
Avoiding ectoparasite attack, such as from biting flies
After analyzing the five hypotheses, the scientists ruled out all but one: avoiding blood-sucking flies. The scientists found that biting flies (such as horseflies and tsetse flies) are the evolutionary driver for zebra stripes.
Why would zebras evolve to have stripes whereas other hooved mammals did not? The study found that, unlike other African hooved mammals living in the same areas as zebras, zebra hair is shorter than the mouthpart length of biting flies, so zebras may be particularly susceptible to annoyance by biting flies.
Yet in science, one solved riddle begets another: Why do biting flies avoid striped surfaces?
[images via headlikeanorange and gif-book]
ucresearch:

The riddle of zebras’ stripes
Why zebras have black and white stripes is a question that has intrigued scientists and spectators for centuries. A research team led by UC Davis, has now examined this riddle (in a very systematic way).
Many hypotheses for zebra stripes have been proposed since Alfred Russel Wallace and Charles Darwin debated the problem 120 years ago. These include:
A form of camouflage
Disrupting predatory attack by visually confusing carnivores
A mechanism of heat management
Having a social function
Avoiding ectoparasite attack, such as from biting flies
After analyzing the five hypotheses, the scientists ruled out all but one: avoiding blood-sucking flies. The scientists found that biting flies (such as horseflies and tsetse flies) are the evolutionary driver for zebra stripes.
Why would zebras evolve to have stripes whereas other hooved mammals did not? The study found that, unlike other African hooved mammals living in the same areas as zebras, zebra hair is shorter than the mouthpart length of biting flies, so zebras may be particularly susceptible to annoyance by biting flies.
Yet in science, one solved riddle begets another: Why do biting flies avoid striped surfaces?
[images via headlikeanorange and gif-book]
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adrienehughes:

Mr. Cow #latergram #cows #netherland (at brunssum NETHERLANDS)
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ucsdhealthsciences:

Delivering Imani’s baby was truly a team effort.
Here’s our anesthesiologist Dr. Mark Greenberg getting some cuddle time with the baby gorilla.
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mothernaturenetwork:

Olympian Gus Kenworthy strikes a pose with Sochi straysSure, the American skier is doing well on the slopes.  Be he’s wowing fans more for what he’s doing on the Sochi sidelines.
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mothernaturenetwork:

375-pound ‘minipig’ inspires 2 men to go veganEsther won the hearts of the men who adopted her, and they’re sharing her story in hopes of inspiring others to see animals as more than meat.
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au2026:

full-on flirt mode engaged.
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dekutree:

like duh
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